Happy birthday, Wilhelm Grimm and some thoughts on creative siblings

Posted by on Feb 24, 2010 in Uncategorized

According to my 2010 edition of A Working Writer’s Daily Planner today is Wilhelm Grimm’s birthday. He is the younger half of the pair affectionately referred to as The Brothers Grimm. According to Wikipedia:

The whole of the lives of the two brothers were passed together. In their school days, they had one bed and one table in common. As students, they had two beds and two tables in the same room. They always lived under one roof, and had their books and property in common.

I can’t help thinking that they were almost like conjoined twins when I read this description. I’m always intrigued by anyone who can successfully collaborate with another individual on a long term basis. Collaboration can be pretty tricky.

I think siblings might have a built in advantage in terms of collaboration, though. Using family games of Pictionary as my point of reference, it seems pretty clear that siblings have a better ability to communicate with one another that gives them an advantage in this area.

Hollywood has some creative sibling pairs in the Coen brothers and the Farrelly brothers. Music has seen it’s fair share of sibling collaboration. Whether your taste runs more towards The Jonas Brothers or Good Charlotte, there are plenty of creative siblings in the music biz. The world of young adult literature, not to mention the blogosphere has the talented and always hilarious Lisa and Laura Roecker.

There is one creative pair you may not be acquainted with, however. I am referring to the multi-talented Sisters Grosso whose collaborative efforts span filmmaking, the world of music and even a few ill-fated literary offerings. As pretty much everything we ever collaborated on was on a level distinctly below amateur, it has little chance of ever seeing the light of day, but having teased you I might as well put something out there.

So, here are the lyrics to the first verse of a little ditty we like to call “You’re So Great” written and performed (though lucky for you there is no performance here to view) in honor of my mother’s 60th birthday. I’m sure you’ll be able to guess the tune (by the way, these lyrics probably makes more sense if you know that my parents met at a fraternity party and that my mother used to iron her hair):

She walked into the party
Like she was ready for her life to start
Her hair strategically straight to catch his eye
She instantly stole is heart
She had one eye on the future
And it looked like a work of art
And of all the boys she knew he’d be her partner. . .
Well, a grammy award for songwriting probably isn’t in our future.
So, happy birthday Wilhelm Grimm, and thank you to creative siblings everywhere. Have you ever collaborated with a sibling? What was the result?

    6 Comments

  1. Aw, that picture is so cute!! What a great memory! I don’t think I ever collaborated with my sisters on doing anything like that, although I’d love to get my sister to do some writing with me. She’s a teacher and she has some great funny stories to share.

  2. Angie: That’s interesting. My sister is a teacher, too, and she’s full of funny stories, as well.

  3. Love the picture! There’s nothing like the early 80′s for good sibling pics. And the song is awesome. You guys totally need to tour.

    And thanks for the shout out! There’s just nothing like a sister or I guess if we’re talking The Grimm Bros, a brother.
    .-= Lisa and Laura┬┤s last blog ..The LiLa Write-Off =-.

  4. Lisa and Laura: I’ve threatened my sister with uploading some of our old homemade movies if I figure out a way to convert them to digital files. They were pretty awful, but in a funny way.

  5. great post as usual!

  6. Genial post and this fill someone in on helped me alot in my college assignement. Gratefulness you on your information.

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